Mummy of Pacheri

Mummy of Pacheri

It is the mummy of a man about 1.65 meter tall, who lived during the Ptolemaic period. We call him the mummy of Pacheri, although the reading of the name remains problematic. The quality of its embalming, as well as the state of conservation make it a specimen noticeable and worthy of notice.

The mummy is a perfect example for anyone wanting to understand the technique of embalming, and that is probably why it attracts such fascination from visitors. What adds to the charm of this mummy, is also its location in the museum. Indeed, located in a small niche at the back of the large sarcophagi room, at the top of the so-called Osiris crypt, the mummy is only visible in a certain dim light and remains well hidden, isolated from other artifacts, as if rest was a necessity for it in such a busy museum.

Numerous tourists, therefore, unaware of its proximity, asked where it is located. In room fifteen. Pacheri is very much unique. Its conservation and display at the Louvre make him an uncontested star of the Egyptian collections in France.

Talk like an Egyptian: mummy’s voice heard 3,0…

Talk like an Egyptian: mummy’s voice heard 3,000 years after death:

This is really quite astonishing. It’s not really his voice, but his sound. And why they were able to discern what it might sound like is interesting, as well.

Talk like an Egyptian: mummy’s voice heard 3,0…

Talk like an Egyptian: mummy’s voice heard 3,000 years after death:

This is really quite astonishing. It’s not really his voice, but his sound. And why they were able to discern what it might sound like is interesting, as well.

Mummy returns: Voice of 3,000-year-old Egypt…

Mummy returns: Voice of 3,000-year-old Egyptian priest brought to life

Scientists have fulfilled a mummified Egyptian priest’s wish for life after death – by replicating his voice with artificial vocal chords.

Nesyamun’s voice has been reproduced as a vowel-like sound that is reminiscent of a sheep’s bleat.

The priest lived during the politically volatile reign of pharaoh Ramses XI, between 1099 and 1069BC. As a priest in Thebes, Nesyamun would have needed a strong voice for his ritual duties, which involved singing.

When Nesyamun died, his voice fell silent, but 3,000 years on, a team of researchers have brought it back to life. They have done so by producing a 3D-printed voice box based Nesyamun’s vocal tract, which was scanned to establish its precise dimensions. Read more.

Mummy of Merneptah

Mummy of Merneptah

King Merneptah was originally buried within tomb (KV8) in the Valley of the Kings, but his mummy was not found there. In 1898 it was located along with eighteen other mummies in the mummy cache found in the tomb of Amenhotep II (KV35) by Victor Loret. The skin of the mummy became unusually brighter, mainly due to the salt that was heavily used in the mummification process.

The pharaoh apparently suffered from dental problems and fractures in his thighbones. In their search for gold, the tomb-robbers split the mummy’s right clavicle and injured the left shoulder, possibly by using a knife or an axe to cut a hole through the body. Now in the Egyptian Museum, Cairo. JE 34562

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